Wireless Headphones

  • Turn the headphones on by winding upwards the ON/OFF switch on the right ear piece, once on the LED to the right of the switch should light up (this should be Red or Green depending upon your model).
  • If LED does not light up please check that the batteries are installed correctly (they should both be facing the same way) and that the batteries are fully charged.
  • Firstly, check that the provided Audio Cable (Yellow ends) is connected to an Audio Output on your TV, this can be one of two connections; one is the Headphone Jack (commonly located on the side of your TV). Please note not all TVs have this Audio Output, in using this output most TV’s will go silent meaning that the sound is now coming out of the headphone TV jack.
  • Secondly, is the Left and Right Audio Output (Red and White) which is generally located on the back of the TV. In using this connection point you will also need to use the provided Red and White cable to connect to the corresponding Red and White Audio Outputs on the back of your TV, then using the provide Yellow Audio Cable connect this to the other end of the Red and White Cable. Please note not all TVs have this Audio Output…double check that you are using the TV’s Output and NOT the Input sockets as these can be the same colour.
  • Once connected to the Audio Output of the TV, then make sure that the other end of the Yellow Audio cable is plugged into the Audio socket on the transmitter. The Transmitter Audio socket is the second socket labelled ‘Audio’ located next to the switch. When plugging this Cable in please make sure the cable is inserted fully and give a little twist to check.
  • Once connected please make sure the transmitter is ON, to do this move switch to the first setting WL (wireless) and the LED above the switch should light up (this should be Red or Green depending upon your model).
  • Check the audio settings on your TV, making sure that the volume isn’t muted or turned down very low. In some cases the TV can have an independent headphone volume control (please refer to your TV user guide). Also check the headphone volume control.
  • Once all of the above has been checked and with the headphones ON, press the RESET button once, then press the SCAN button once (do not hold either button down, just press and release). After 3 seconds if your TV signal is not coming through your headphones, press and release the SCAN again (you may need to do this a few times).
  • Ensure that the power cable is connected and turned on at the wall and if applicable that the power is turned on at the transmitter base also.
  • Check the audio settings on your TV, making sure that the volume isn’t muted or turned down very low. In some cases the TV can have an independent headphone volume control (please refer to your TV user guide). Also check the headphone volume control.
  • Check that the Audio input cable is connected to an audio output on your TV, this can be one of two connections one is the headphone jack and the second is the left and right audio output which is generally located on the back of the TV.

The cause of the sound cutting out is the way the TV is designed when connecting to the headphone jack.

If this is the only Audio Output Source (this is the case with about 30% of the TV’s on the market) you will need to purchase a Digital to Analogue Converter from your local electrical retailer. This will convert your digital output to a usable Left and Right (Red and White) connections.

First step, double check that you are actually using the OUTPUTS and not the INPUTS on the back of your TV, there should be a label above the connections to check. Next, instead of connecting to the transmitter connect directly to the headphones, this will then test to make sure that you are getting sound though your outputs. Once confirmed re-connect back to the transmitter.

Check the audio settings on your TV, making sure that the volume isn’t muted or turned down very low. In some cases the TV can have an independent headphone volume control (please refer to your TV user guide). Also check the headphone volume control. You can double check this by plugging your headphones directly in this jack on the TV to confirm the sound output then adjust as required.

The Transmitter uses a FM Frequency to send the signal to the Headphones, and as such in some parts of Australia the Headphones may also pick up some Radio Stations. If this happens just press the RESET button once, then press the SCAN button once (do not hold either button down, just press and release). After 3 seconds if your TV signals is not coming through your headphones, press and release the SCAN again (you may need to do this a few times).

While a serious talk about treating your ears with kindness for a lifetime of good hearing is an important conversation to have, kids will be kids and a little preventative action on your behalf will ensure their hearing is protected when they’re too young to make smart choices and protect it themselves.

Select headphones that are the over ear style and are labelled as having a maximum output level of 85dB or lower.

Limit the use of headphones to 1-2 hours at a time.

Volume Limited Headphones

The Center for Disease Control in the USA recommends a maximum noise level of 85 decibels (dB). Experts also suggest that the time spent listening to headphones should be limited to two hours a day (for children and adults), even if the volume is limited at 85dB.

Sound pressure from noise is amplified in the narrower developing ear canals of young children and babies, making them more sensitive and susceptible to hearing damage. Kids can perceive a noise to be up to 20dB louder than an adult. Hearing loss is cumulative and irreversible, and your child may not notice the effects until much later in life. Sound intensity is measured in decibels (dB) with a sound level meter. Noise-induced hearing loss can result from listening to loud sounds (above 85dB) over an extended period. The louder the sound, the shorter the time period before hearing damage occurs.

The damage from noise exposure is usually gradual, so a person might not notice or might ignore signs of hearing loss until more pronounced symptoms of permanent hearing loss become apparent.

Noticeable signs of hearing loss can include the following:

  • Muffled or distorted hearing
  • Difficulty hearing sounds such as birds singing, crickets chirping, alarm clocks, watch alarms, telephones, or doorbells
  • Difficulty understanding speech during telephone conversations or while participating in group conversations
  • Pain or ringing in the ears (tinnitus) after exposure to excessively loud sounds

Although a largely hidden and infrequently highlighted disability, the World Health Organisation (WHO) describes the global burden of hearing impairment as the most frequent sensory deficit in the human population.

Noise exposures add up throughout daily activities. However, certain events, behaviours, and environmental factors can expose young people to unsafe sound levels.

  • Playing your music at a high volume on a portable audio device
  • Using earphones that reach into your ear
  • Sitting too close to a speaker or TV
  • Exposing yourself to a reasonably loud noise for a long time
  • Not using ear plugs when you are around loud noise

All volume limiting devices are electronic resistors embedded either in the cable or inside the pair of headphones themselves. The resistor is a little tiny passive electrical component which (as the name implies) creates resistance in a circuit. That resistance lowers the current flow and by lowering the current flow from the source device to the
headphones, the resulting sound volume is also lowered.
Good overhead over-ear headphones significantly block outside noise which means your child may never even approach the upper threshold of the volume limit in the first place because they hear everything clearly at lower volume levels.

Headphones Product Support